Skip to main content

Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

Click "More / Share / Borrow" for each clip's source context and citation link. HTML5 compatible browser required

Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Barack Obama
President of the United States
KPIX 12/17/2013
Obama: by sifting through this so-called meta data they may identify potential leads with respect to folks who might engage in terrorism. Crawford: But in his decision, Judge Leon questioned whether the program even works, saying the government does not cite a single instance where the program actually stopped an imminent attack.
Jan Crawford
CBS Political Correspondent and CBS News Chief Legal Correspondent
KPIX 12/17/2013
Crawford: Edward Snowden leaked details of the program's existence and the legal battles come as the administration now is reviewing whether all of its surveillance programs should continue. Monday's ruling by Judge Leon who was appointed by George W. Bush, is the first to call the telephone program unconstitutional. 15 other judges on a special court to review classified programs have upheld it on 35 different occasions.
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
CNNW 12/18/2013
Paul: I’m very offend that the intelligence director lied to congress which is perjury and punishable by time in jail, and the President has glibly gone on his way, has not asked for his resignation, has not said that he will try him in court for lying to congress. I find that really -- that Clapper is lying to Congress is probably more injurious to our intelligent capabilities than anything Snowden did because Clapper has damaged the credibility of the entire intelligence apparatus and I'm not sure what to believe anymore when they come to Congress.
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
CNNW 12/18/2013
Paul: the government is breaking the law, and that is the argument here, and now it's been upheld by a federal court saying that the government is breaking the law, and i do think what you're government is doing is unconstitutional, and i really think that in order to restore confidence in our intelligence community, i think James Clapper should resign.
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
CNNW 12/18/2013
Blitzer: So just to be precise, if it were up to you, you'd have the justice department file charges, criminal charges, against James Clapper? Paul: Otherwise you're just encouraging people to lie to us, and then we have no confidence now -- if the intelligence community says we're not spying on Americans and they are, and then they say we're not collecting any data, it's hard to have confidence in them. Now they are saying we capture terrorists with this data. Are we to believe them or not to believe them? If they are going to come to us and lie it really damages the credibility, and it's damaged our credibility worldwide, but really with the American people because we don't know what to believe. I don't know how you can have someone in charge over intelligence who has known to lie in a public forum to Congress, to lie without repercussions I really blame the President for not taking a better handle on things.
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
CNNW 12/19/2013
Rand Paul: Clapper's lying to congress is probably more injurious to our intelligence capabilities than anything Snowden did because Clapper has damaged the credibility of the entire intelligence apparatus and I'm not sure what to believe anymore when they come to Congress.
Peter King
U.S. Senator, R-New York, Homeland Security Committee
CNNW 12/19/2013
King: That is absolutely disgraceful to compare General Clapper with a traitor. The fact is general Clapper was put in an impossible position because the senator who asked the question had already gotten the information in a classified setting. He knew that General Clapper could not give the full answer because it would let our enemies know what we were doing. The question was wrong. General Clapper gave the best answer he could, and for Senator Paul to compare that patriot, General Clapper, with someone like Snowden, who is a traitor, who has put American lives at risk, Senator Paul should be ashamed of himself. He’s an absolute disgrace. He disgraced me. He disgraced his office and he owes General Clapper an apology immediately.
Peter King
U.S. Senator, R-New York, Homeland Security Committee
CNNW 12/19/2013
Blitzer: spokesman for General Clapper issued a statement among other things just a little while ago, responding to) other republican lawmakers who have sent a letter calling on him to resign. This is part of the statement. Let me put it on the screen. “DNI, Director of National Intelligence Clapper, had been testifying before members of Congress for more than two decades and he enjoys a well-earned reputation as a doggedly honest and honorable public servant. He apologized for the confusion caused by his response and is focused on working with the intelligence committees to increase transparency.” A lot of republicans want him -- apparently there's a letter out there as you well know, including members of the House republicans who want Clapper to resign. You totally are opposed to all of that. King: Absolutely. That comes from the isolationist wing of the party. That goes back to the days of Charles Lindbergh. These are people who are apologizing for America. That is not the republican tradition that is not the tradition of Ronald Reagan.(It’s the tradition of the radical left wing democrats of the 1960’s.)
Peter King
U.S. Senator, R-New York, Homeland Security Committee
CNNW 12/27/2013
King: Let me say several things. First of all, e-mails are not being surveilled. The NSA on its own stopped doing that more than two years ago because they felt they cannot ensure privacy because there was so much extraneous information in an e-mail. So they stopped that. There is no e-mail surveillance. It stopped more than two years ago.
Peter King
U.S. Senator, R-New York, Homeland Security Committee
CNNW 12/27/2013
King: As far as General Clapper, he was in a position, He was asked a question by a senator that the senator knew the answer to. It had already been discussed in a private confidential top secret session because we did not want the enemy to know what we were doing and what we were capable of. What General Clapper was trying to do, first of all, he didn't expect a question like that would be asked in public, because of its top secret nature, and he tried to give an answer which he thought was the least offensive, where he would be protecting the men and women of the NSA and those -- and protect the (programs we are using to stop al quaeda. There's nothing in this for the NSA. They have not abused this, are not using it for political purposes, they're not going after anyone. They are doing it to save American lives and it has worked. That's what General Clapper was trying to protect.
Showing 871 through 880 of 1708